Good Housekeeping Article on Food Safety —

For some reading my Facebook and Blog, may think…”Really Robin do I care if an undeclared allergen was in such and such food,..or that company recalled something for suspected e.coli?” For others have actually thanked me for posting these food recalls and were completely unaware that certain foods were recalled.

Everyone I know that shares a story of “food poisoning” shares an intense memory of their close relationship with the bathroom.  Each individual has suspect of where they were sickened or exactly what food caused them to be sick.  Would it not be awesome to completely avoid the illness (actually — life threatening poisoning) altogether?

This Good Housekeeping Article http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/womens-health/how-to-keep-food-safe?click=main_sr  shares stories of families changed forever by food borne illness and changes proposed to our food safety to protect each of us.  The top of the 8 page article shares the top suspect foods in food safety.  The editor’s note is in the middle and the article contains 8 pages of information and stories.  The story received so much attention, that the Editor posted this response and awesome information:

Editor’s Note: Seldom do we see immediate action from the top down when we cover these major issues. Yet that’s exactly what happened on September 13th, the same week our October issue hit newsstands with its report on the sometimes shocking lapses in government oversight of our food supply’s safety. At long last, the USDA declared all “Big Six” strains of deadly E. coli bacteria “adulterants” — a move GH strongly recommended in this article. This means that starting in March 2012, certain food producers (such as beef producers) will have to test for these strains and, if they are found, destroy the batch or cook it to kill the bacteria. (Before, people had to fall ill — even die — before the contaminated food was tracked down.) Consumer groups and legislators like Senator Kirsten Gillibrand have been lobbying for years to get changes like this made. It’s a real victory to have the USDA take this giant step, and we are proud to have been a part of the push.

Read more: Food Safety – Food Safety Tips – Good Housekeeping

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